What's Hidden in Your History? 3 Things to do to Protect Your Cyber Privacy

2016 proved to be a dumpster fire of mass proportions. It seemed that every news notification that popped up was about election hacks, Russian meddling and government oversight. Now that it's a new year, there is some hope that things might be different. Though the country is still divided about the person being sworn in on inauguration day, there still has to be good news to be found somewhere. As luck would have it, there is, and it's about cybersecurity.

Before the details are exposed, here's a question for you: what does your cybersecurity plan look like? Can your business or non-profit survive a cyber breach? If an adversary were to gain entry into your network, what sensitive information could they expose? Would they release the number of undocumented immigrants your non-profit supports? Would they sell private data about your colleagues who are of the Islamic faith? Could they try to expose the health records of your female staff?

There's a lot of fear out there about how the incoming administration will protect or negate the rights of undocumented immigrants and minority groups. Fortunately, there are people in the tech world who are doing everything they can to protect the privacy of these individuals.

Security Without Borders: Our White Hat Heroes
In recent media reports, cyber hackers have not been represented in a positive light. Hacking collectives like WikiLeaks have fallen from the public's good graces, demonstrating that "absolute power corrupts absolutely," with hacking leaders like Julian Assange perpetrating hidden agendas instead of shedding light.

Is there such a thing as a noble hacker anymore? There is. Claudio Guarnieri, an experienced researcher and white hat hacker, has set up a cooperative of cyber hackers and tech researchers that will work with disenfranchised groups to aid them in their cybersecurity efforts. Named Security Without Borders, the group works to protect NGOs and activists who work to "expose corruption, fight racism and fight for justice and democracy." Made up of a united front of white hacker volunteers, Security Without Borders "assists with web security assessments, conduct[s] breach investigations and analysis, and generally acts as an advisor in questions pertaining to cybersecurity."

With the current political climate the way it is, it makes sense if wondering why this group of people wants to volunteer their services to groups that actively oppose certain political ideologies. Guarnieri and white hat hackers like him have found that cybersecurity researchers and analysts have been joining startups and fortune 500 companies, leaving small businesses and NGOs to fend for themselves.

According to Digital Trends, "groups like NGOs often deal with sensitive data, whether related to corruption or the private information of the people they are trying to help. As a result, they can become targets for opposition groups and officials." White hat hackers like Guarnieri hope to stymie the inequality in cyber protection between NGOs and big business.

If there is anything to know about cyber hacking, it's that you need protection on all sides. Should a cybercriminal break into your system, you need a cybersecurity plan in place that will cover the costs. CyberPolicy can help you and your business. Click or call today.

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